Aperture

The other day, I went over a few things you can do to help improve your photography. Exposure was on the list, and aperture is one of the elements of exposure. I hadn’t planned to write anything about aperture or exposure so soon because I feel that I have yet to master the topic, but when I was out shooting the other day, I managed to take a couple of photos that I think illustrate it really well.

Basically, aperture determines how wide your camera’s shutter opens when you take a photo. It is measured in F-stops; low numbers are a shallow depth of field, and high numbers are deeper. Aperture can also affect the amount of light in the photo, so it works with your shutter speed and ISO to determine how light or dark your pictures are. I am not going to get into detail on all that today, though; I’m not sure I understand it well enough to explain it in detail and keep things interesting. Instead, I’m just going to show you what I shot.

mockingbird and babies
A mockingbird and its babies perched on a sign

See how the trees are in focus, and the birds are not? I shot this with a high F-stop, to compensate for my high shutter speed and the cloudy day. When I realized what I had done, I decreased my F-stop for a more shallow depth of field, and took the picture below.

mockingbird and babies
A clearer picture of the birds

Now the birds are clear, and the shallow depth of field has put the background out of focus, making the birds stand out even more. Had I dropped my F-stop even further, I might have had an even better photo. I was just experimenting with my settings at that time, and unfortunately the birds flew away before I could decrease my F-stop again and take another shot.

Luckily, I have a few other interesting photos from that day, and I hope they’ll help you to understand what a difference understanding aperture can make to your photography.

red hibiscus
A red hibiscus captured from the side

You can see that the flower is quite sharp, but the background is out of focus. I love photographing flowers; they’re beautiful from every angle, they don’t move much (except when it’s windy) so I don’t have to worry about them getting up and leaving, and it’s usually inexpensive or free. I can change camera settings and practice as much as I want. Yay!

yellow hibiscus
A yellow hibiscus up close

Here’s one more; the flower’s pistil is in focus, but the petals are not. Once again, this is due to a low aperture. It’s sort of my taste to have photos with a sharply focused subject toward the center, usually a close-up, and a shallow depth of field is good for that style of photography. However, a large aperture is better for things like landscape photos, where you want more of the image to be in focus. I don’t do a lot of landscape photography at this point, but I do have a couple of examples.

sunsphere world's fair park
The Sunsphere and World’s Fair Park in downtown Knoxville, TN.
Women's Basketball Hall of Fame
The Women’s Basketball Hall of Fame

Although I have other landscape pictures, they were from my days of shooting in auto and hoping for the best, so I’m not going to share them today. I’d rather use this blog for the shots that I’ve taken in manual, so I can keep track of the progress I make. But both of these are examples of subjects you would want to tackle with a fairly large aperture, so you can capture as much detail as you can.

That’s all I have today! If you have questions or comments, please leave them in the comment box below. I’d love to hear your thoughts.